Dominican Swear Words

Why do adults work so hard to keep children from using words that so many adults use themselves?Why do adults work so hard to keep children from using words that so many adults use themselves?

A few weeks ago, my husband, 20-month-old daughter and I were in the car when another vehicle swerved around us dangerously.

Shawn yelled out the driver's seat window in frustration, a response neither he nor I processed until we heard Gracie's echo from her car seat in the back.

"Fah you, " she said sweetly.

It was the moment friends had warned us was approaching with our chatty toddler, and now that it was here, Shawn and I tried hard not to laugh.

I told Shawn we would need to watch our language, cutting out curses and using the spell-it-out trick for other questionable language.

But Shawn — a Ph.D.-educated man whom I usually describe as a grown-up Boy Scout for his kind heart and good character — surprised me with another viewpoint.

"I don't really have a problem with her swearing, " he said.

At first I thought he was just trying to get himself off the hook for being the inspiration for our daughter's first f-bomb. But the more I think about it, the more I wonder why adults work so hard to keep our children from using words that so many of us use.

Really, what would be so wrong with allowing our children to cuss?

Again and again at the playground I hear fellow parents encouraging their toddlers to "use your words" instead of collapsing into a screaming meltdown.

And then there was that fascinating Slate article in February that tried to demystify the brain of a toddler. Some 10, 000 Facebook users shared the piece in which Alicia Lieberman, a professor of infant mental health at the University of California at San Francisco, likened the pain toddlers feel when a parent takes something away to the emotion we might feel if our spouse betrays or cheats on us.

So Gracie feels like her husband has cheated when we force her to come inside for dinner?

I'd say that definitely justifies a "damn."

There has been research on this topic. In a recent study of New England children whose language was monitored, analysts noted that children 1 to 2 years old were already familiar with 13 offensive words, ranging from "poopy" to the word Gracie echoed in the car.

Children 3 and 4 had almost four times that many bad words in their vocabularies, with "jerk, " "hate you" and "crap" being the ones we can publish in the newspaper.

"It's pretty clear that it's inevitable kids learn them, and they're going to learn them whether or not you try to stop them, " said Kristin Janscewitz, a professor of psychology at Marist College who co-wrote the study.

Janscewitz went on to note that swearing has never been linked to violent behavior in public. Rather, some studies have highlighted the benefits of swearing, like the ability to tolerate more pain, she said.

"In a way, I think too much attention is paid to the perceived harm of swearing, and it's a distraction from other social issues, " Janscewitz said. "I don't know why people get so hot under the collar about this stuff."

Kathy Heskin, a professor of theology at Dominican University, assures me that there's nothing in the Bible that covers swearing, so Shawn and I won't go straight to H-E-double hockey sticks for this perspective.

She went on to explain that, although she curses as much as the next person, she raised her children not to swear in front of her.

You might also like
Caribbean cooking: How to make stewed chicken with brown
Caribbean cooking: How to make stewed chicken with brown ...
How to make Stew Chicken in Dominica
How to make Stew Chicken in Dominica
How to make Pollo Guisado (Chicken Stew)
How to make Pollo Guisado (Chicken Stew)
Salvadoran Small Red Beans, Central America, Frijol Rojo De Seda, Bush 100 Seeds
Lawn & Patio
  • Salvadoran red beans are small and dark, dark red. beautiful little beans, all imported from El Salvador. They have a fresh, sweet flavor and rich, creamy texture...
  • It has an exotic scent and flavor that goes very well with the beans. And if you still don t have a pressure cooker, what are you waiting for? It saves, time, energy...
  • Red beans, frijoles rojo.is a heirloom Bush-type bean, old fashioned type, with 3 runners. Must be staked toavoid bean pods touching the ground. Beautiful bright...
  • The Salvadorean red beans are much smaller than our red kidney beans. They are also a darker red with a different flavor. Frijol de seda Bean is normally fairly...
  • A Delicious Dominican Stewed Beans Recipe or Habichuelas Guisadas Dominicanas This red beans recipe is one of my favorites, it s so tasty. Dominican stewed beans...
Beans, Salvadorian Small Red Beans / Frijol Rojo De Seda, Heirloom Bush 100 Seeds
Lawn & Patio
  • Salvadoran red beans are small and dark, dark red,beautiful little beans, all imported from El Salvador. They have a fresh, sweet flavor and rich, creamy texture...
  • Salvadoran Red Bean & Loroco Soup. 20 ounces Salvadoran red beans 4 ounces loroco, minced 4 ounces minced onion 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon oregano 2...
  • Combine all ingredients and 12 cups cold water in pressure cooker. Cover and bring to pressure over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook for 45 minutes...
  • A Delicious Dominican Stewed Beans Recipe or Habichuelas Guisadas Dominicanas This red beans recipe is one of my favorites, it s so tasty. Dominican stewed beans...
Chicken Stew Arroz Con Pollo Y Plantain @DestinyGodley
Chicken Stew Arroz Con Pollo Y Plantain @DestinyGodley
How to Make Dominican-Style Stewed Chicken
How to Make Dominican-Style Stewed Chicken
Dominican style stewed Chicken/ Pollo guisado. delicious
Dominican style stewed Chicken/ Pollo guisado. delicious ...
Related Posts